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Fat Tuesday, Ash Wednesday, & Catholic Lenten Traditions

On this episode, the guys talk about Fat Tuesday, Ash Wednesday, and Catholic Lenten Traditions – plus the Catholic origin of McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish and the traditional 40 Day Beer Only Lenten Fast!

In this episode we’ll cover:

  • What foods do Catholics eat on Fat Tuesday?
  • Where do the ashes come from for Ash Wednesday?
  • What foods can’t Catholics eat during Lent?
  • The Catholic origins of the McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish
  • The traditional 40-day beer-only Lenten fast
  • And Much More!

If you want to support Father Michael Nixon rebuild as was suggested in the episode, you can view his GoFundMe page here


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8 comments on Fat Tuesday, Ash Wednesday, & Catholic Lenten Traditions

  1. Sheri Steele says:

    I love your bringing the cool to Catholics!! Thanks gents!

  2. Debra Garcia says:

    WHAT AN AMAZING SHOW!!! Cool Catholic Dudes and Priest. Bringing the fun and not leaving out the lesson and the meaning of our Faith. What a way to catch the attention of young and some of us old Catholics. I love it. Thank you so much. This was my first time seeing this and I am sure going to stay and recommend to others.
    Keep up the great evangelizing. God Bless You and have a beautiful and prayerful Lent.

  3. Maria O. Dorr says:

    Thank you for the information of our practices of Lent. I had not thought of what the meaning of “Carnaval”. Being that I am a Spanish speaking person it makes a lot of sense. Thank you for sharing.

  4. King Cake for sure!! I live 90 miles from New Orleans, and my daughter-in- law is from New Orleans. Her sister is a chef in New Orleans as well. The parades are magical.

  5. Melissa says:

    I am going nuts but in my area we eat pancakes! We eat a version of king cake at Epiphany.

  6. David says:

    I watch your show with interest in the UK where ‘Fat Tuesday’ is a completely unknown term. The reason? Here we call it ‘Shrove Tuesday’ and the why gets more interesting. The word ‘shrove’ comes from the old Roman Catholic practice of being ‘shriven’ – meaning to confess one’s sins. The shriving bell would be rung on Shrove Tuesday to call people to church to confess.

    Before Lent could begin in earnest, all edible temptations needed to be removed. This took place over a period of days known as ‘Shrovetide’. Meat such as bacon would be eaten up on ‘Collop Monday’ (a collop is a thin slice of meat). And on Shrove Tuesday eggs, butter and stocks of fat would be used up. One of the easiest ways to dispose of these items was to turn them into pancakes or fritters, a custom which continued long after the Church of England separated from the Roman Catholic Church in the 16th century.

    Here in the UK, the secular world now call this day ‘Pancake Day’ and across the country, people make and eat pancakes with lemon and sugar, or chocolate and all other kinds of sweet fillings. Within the Catholic church and among other Christian and wider populations, it is still called ‘Shrove Tuesday’ and for us Catholics, to confess our sins on Shrove Tuesday and feast on Pancakes is a wonderful and good way to start this deeply profound season.

  7. Paul Bany says:

    I didn’t have any chance of watching your Talk Show until ASH WEDNESDAY today. I think your overall Talks Show on Ash Wednesday was handsome and amazing. I have really enjoyed watching it and I have also learned a lot from your it. Now is the time to chastise our flesh through 40 days fasting, almsgiving, penance, and prayers for a greater glory. Well done on your Talk Show and keep it up!

  8. Paul Bany says:

    Paul Bany
    March 6, 2019 at 2:14 pm
    I didn’t have any chance of watching your Talk Show until ASH WEDNESDAY today. I think your overall Talk Show on Ash Wednesday was handsome and amazing. I have really enjoyed watching it and I have also learned a lot from it. Now is the time to chastise our flesh through 40 days fasting, almsgiving, penance, and prayers for a greater glory. Well done on your Talk Show and keep it up!

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